Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Tracking Battery Life

When I bought my new hearing aids in October, they came with three years' worth of hearing aid batteries from my wonderful audiologist. Today I stopped by to pick up some more and learned that they had switched brands. Previously I was using Rayovac Proline batteries, and what I got today are "Audigy Group" branded batteries, but I'm not sure of the manufacturer.

So far I've noticed that my hearing aids' battery life is dependent on the brand. Energizer standard 312s gave me just a couple days of life while Rayovac Prolines give me a week or so. I'm curious to see how these Audigy Group batteries do. I thought about using a paper calendar and just attaching the strips from the batteries as I put new ones in, but this brand is manufactured without those strips.

So I decided to make a Google Calendar for my batteries. I just set up a new calendar (under "My Calendars" at the left, select Create) and it became one of my half a dozen other calendars in Google. I just add a notation for the day "L (or R) - Rayovac (or Audigy Group, or Energizer, etc)" to tell me which side I switched out and what brand I replaced the battery with.

Have any of you been tracking battery life? What are your results? How do you track it?

8 comments:

  1. We have hearing aids in Wales programmed to tell you your batteries are failing... but in Welsh. As soon as the electronics pick up loss of power it tells you through the earpiece.

    ReplyDelete
  2. My aids beep when they're failing. It's helpful to know.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes, mine beep too. But what I'm interested to know is how long various brands last before they die, which is why I started a calendar. I was only getting a couple days out of one brand versus a week for another, which is a big difference! :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have Phonak Audeo Smart aids which use a 312 battery. It's like clockwork that the batteries run out after five days. When one goes out I replace them both because the other one will be going out within hours of the first.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I do the same thing, track the battery life with a Google calendar. Most of the time it's fairly consistent, but it's nice to know when there might be a problem when it is not consistent.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I notice a difference in battery life using the same brand, from package to package. I've had the best luck with batteries from a store that has a fast turn over like Costco. Usually 5-7 days, other stores as little as 3 days.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I am very much impressed with this article. Thanks very much for sharing good information and helpful suggestions. Hearing aid batteries normally last 7-14 days when the hearing aid is used 16 hours per day. Performance will vary depending on the style and type of hearing aid technology you are using. The kind of battery hearing aids make use of is contingent to the size of the battery and supposed lifetime. Battery life depends on the power used by the hearing aid gadget.
    Hearing test

    ReplyDelete
  8. I thought about using a paper calendar and just attaching the strips from the batteries as I put new ones in, but this brand is manufactured without those strips. clock batteries

    ReplyDelete

All comments on my blog are moderated, and I reserve the right not to publish any comments for any reason. This blog is set up so that anyone can comment. If you have trouble, email me, or check Blogger's help section.