Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Is Tinnitus Genetic? Only 11% Of the Time

Have you ever experienced tinnitus - the uncomfortable sensation of sound (ringing, whining, or buzzing) in your head? I know I have, and many other people, as well. It's just not fun. I tended to experience it more often with my older hearing aids. Since getting my new aids, the strange ringing in my head has gone away, thankfully. I mean, I wouldn't want to have to use a treatment named after a method of suicide, after all.

This recent post from Medical News Today sheds a bit of light on the heritability of tinnitus. You might think that like many diseases, tinnitus has a genetic component. You would be right, but it turns out that only 11% of people who suffer from tinnitus have it because of a genetic factor. Far more common is the environment. If you have hearing loss due to exposure to loud noises, you might get tinnitus. If your parents suffer, it's not 100% certain that you will suffer, too.

Tinnitus is a pretty weird disorder. The more we know about it, the better!

11 comments:

  1. I have Tinnitus all the time. I believe it is not a disease or a disorder or a genetic. I believe it came from the audiologist giving you a hearing test. The test contains high frequency pitch and that damages the nerves.

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  2. For me, I believe that the most considering factor of having a tinnitus is your diet and lifestyle. Especially now a days, we exposed too much on expressed music, that we can't leave without them. Tinnitus Miracle helps you divert your attention and focus to your condition (if you have a tinnitus).

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  3. I've had tinnitus all my life. My grandfather on my mother's side had it, and so did my father. Now lucky 'ol me. Ive Only 11% though? Wonder how that works. I didn't have a hearing test until I entered grade school, and wasn't really exposed to loud music (unless my father's old boom box counts). My paternal grandfather got the condition from working on The Enterprise in the navy back before hearing protection was really required. I think you can get tinnitus a lot of different ways, I just got lucky diving in to the genetic gene pool.

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  4. im doing a project about it!! can it be genetically gotten or not??

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  5. My dad and aunt has it. I only recently got it (2010) at the age of 31. In our cases, it was *not* a result of loud noises (neither of them are concert goers/musicians/work in unusually loud environments). I'm positive that it's a result of an extra sensitive nerve that over-reacts to panic/worry/stress.

    Mine started with insomnia and slowly got worse with my insomnia. It also gets worse when I have avid dreaming/nightmares. I find that it temporarily gets better with exercise/cardio/hot shower, then it goes back. It's really sad pathetic to see so many doctors/ENTs' impotence and inability to provide any useful answers or treatment at all.

    So in my case it's genetic. I'm definitely not having kids. Tinnitus is probably one of the worse things you can have because you cannot make it go away, there's no useful treatment, and the louder I hear it, the more I want to commit suicide. The veterans who have loud tinnitus have it the worse. I wish the health community can give the same attention to tinnitus as it does for breast cancer/aids/MS...etc.

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    Replies
    1. If it is caused by stress perhaps an anti anxiety medication can help.

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  6. I got it at 15 my brother has it and so does his daughter, im pretty sure we got it from my dad who also has it. I've never thought about suicide but at times it can be tough . Im 36 now and like most people I've learned to live with my disability. But tonight it's at it's worst. Buzzing screaming from both ears . Not sure if the massage earlier today relaxed my mind to the point of where the sound are so loud and intense or they just that way tonight just because they can and nothing can be done about it . Either way it drove me to the point to look it up on the internet and I've been ok with it since the Dr. Diagnosed me at 15 and said there was nothing to do about it .21 years later I go and look it up , I guess that Dr. was right , a whole bunch of empty promises . A lot of studies and new treatments but for the rock star , military or heavy Machine worker ... nothing for the one who was born this way (11%) but even for the 89% it still sounds to me like they have not gotten no where SMH

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  7. I got it at 15 my brother has it and so does his daughter, im pretty sure we got it from my dad who also has it. I've never thought about suicide but at times it can be tough . Im 36 now and like most people I've learned to live with my disability. But tonight it's at it's worst. Buzzing screaming from both ears . Not sure if the massage earlier today relaxed my mind to the point of where the sound are so loud and intense or they just that way tonight just because they can and nothing can be done about it . Either way it drove me to the point to look it up on the internet and I've been ok with it since the Dr. Diagnosed me at 15 and said there was nothing to do about it .21 years later I go and look it up , I guess that Dr. was right , a whole bunch of empty promises . A lot of studies and new treatments but for the rock star , military or heavy Machine worker ... nothing for the one who was born this way (11%) but even for the 89% it still sounds to me like they have not gotten no where SMH

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  8. I recently had a very bad episode of fainting and when I came around I had an intense loud noise in my ears. About a week later I noticed the ringing in my ears and have had it ever since. It is particularly bad in the mornings upon waking up, but during the day whenever it is quiet I hear it clearly. My mother also suffered terribly from tinnitus and so I am thinking I have always had the genetic possiblity but I am sure the stress caused by my fainting episode has brought it on. Like a 'trigger switch'. Distressing to know that it is a forever problem.

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  9. How does tinnitus start? Is it like one day your ears start to buzz and they just never stop? It's just I'm worried I'm getting it but mine isn't like I've been reading about. I'll get a really loud buzzing, usually from one ear but sometimes from both, when it's particularly quiet for a few seconds, a minute or so at most, and then it disappears and then it can be weeks and weeks before it happens again. I'm just worried that I'll end up with it permanently because my mum has it. In her case it's from working in a lab half of her life, with drills and machines going all the time. However, besides the odd concert, I don't really have any loud environments. Could it be tinnitus, or is it something else?

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  10. I'd never even thought of it NOT being hereditary; my dad has it severely, to the point where he can barely hear, and I've never heard what actual "silence" sounds like. There's always a buzzing. (Granted, it might've been like a frog in a boiling pot: it came progressively in my childhood so I didn't see it coming). only 11%? Well, I'm incredibly dependant on (and thankful for) luck, so I'm not gunna start questioning its methods. ^.^

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