Sunday, July 24, 2011

Deaf Bicyclist Creates Deaf Bike Signs

Image from DeafBikeSigns.
Image is of a yellow patch saying "DEAF CYCLIST."
Lately I've been thinking more about getting a bike and exploring my new neighborhood. I loved biking as a kid and teenager - it seemed like a great way to explore larger distances than a walk, and I liked it. But my neighborhood doesn't have sidewalks and the thought has crossed my mind before - would I hear a car or another person behind me, or other sounds that might be important?

I was happy to see this article & interview with Portland bicyclist Carrie Brewer. She is a deaf bicyclist who created DeafBikeSigns, which are small, yellow patches that attach to bikes and say "DEAF" or "DEAF CYCLIST." They range from $6 to $8 and can be attached basically anywhere a patch can go. The site recommends that they be attached in an area easily visible, such as the back of a helmet, or behind the seat.

I think I might just pick one of these up after I buy my bicycle, and probably attach it behind the seat somewhere. According to Carrie in the article:
It was a solution to my own problem, a simple answer to the real problem. But then I know there are many other Deaf cyclists that face the same problems so I wanted to help them too, not just myself.

3 comments:

  1. I think this a brilliant idea put into practice.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I go hiking every weekend with a hearing friend, and we've had several close calls with cyclists. Most of the time they don't call out a warning, so we rely on my friend to hear them coming.

    But while hiking today I thought about what would happen if I was alone...

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  3. Attach a little mirror to your bicycle helmet on the left side, and you'll see what's coming up on you. The same can be applied to the side of your glasses/sunglasses while hiking, and you'll see what's barreling down on you!

    Lucky

    ReplyDelete

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